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GHG Reduction Research

UC Davis Travel Behavior Research: Commuter Response to Fix I-5 Project

RESEARCH FINDINGS

Number 2, August 2010

Travel Behavior: Commuter Response to the Fix I-5 Project

Two years ago this summer, a one-mile stretch of Interstate 5 in downtown Sacramento was intermittently closed over a period of nine weeks for a $27 million reconstruction project. As “The Fix” kicked off, government and business leaders who were worried about congestion and the potential economic impacts of the closure actively promoted commute alternatives, including flex schedules, four-day work weeks, carpooling, transit and telecommuting. At the request of Governor Schwarzenegger, UC Davis research teams led by Civil and Environmental Engineering professors Michael Zhang and Pat Mokhtarian launched a study to track and analyze traveler response. The goal was to learn from the experience and help transportation planners prepare for future fixes in an efficient way. The preliminary findings show auto trips dropped – but not as much as one might expect, and some commuters adopted permanent changes – but not attributable solely to The Fix.

Read more about this project


Download Pat Mokhtarian’s findings

Download Rachel Carpenter’s findings

Learn more about Michael Zhang

Learn more about Pat Mokhtarian

Visit the Research Findings archive for ITS-Davis research results that are guiding governments, NGOs and industry toward a clean transportation future.

By Lauren Michele

In a time where transportation policy efforts are pointing toward economic, environmental and equitable stewardship, Lauren Michele - Founder and Author of Policy in Motion - offers combined knowledge as a practicing transportation planning consultant and sustainable policy analyst who works on connecting federal and state legislative priorities with local and regional implementation.

Lauren Michele crafts and implements transportation projects and regulatory frameworks which work toward complete community sustainability and people-oriented development - facilitating access to affordable living near quality jobs, food, schools and health services. A graduate of the UC Davis Institute of Transportation Studies and researcher with the University's Urban Land Use and Transportation Center, Ms. Michele's background extends from in-classroom teaching of undergraduate courses in transportation policy to experiential learning while living and researching multi-modal transportation planning in Europe.

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